Posted on

Crystek VCXO with low phase noise

Crystek VCXO with low phase noise

Crystek VCXO with low phase noise

Crystek has brought out an ultra-low phase noise HCMOS VCXO with standby mode, featuring a close-in phase noise of -90dBc/Hz @ 10Hz offset and a typical noise floor of -168dBc/Hz @ 100kHz offset.

The CVHD-957 is suitable for applications such as: Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) Professional CD audio equipment DACs and ADCs for HD audio.

Developed frequencies are: 22.5792 MHz 24.576 MHz

The company writes:

Crystek’s Model CVHD-957 HCMOS VCXO family has been designed specifically for High Definition Audio (HD Audio). It features a typical low close-in phase noise of -90 dBc/Hz @ 10 Hz offset, and a noise floor of -168 dBc/Hz. With this extreme low phase noise performance, you will “Hear the Difference”.

It also features a “Standby Function”, that is, when placed in disable mode, the internal oscillator is completely shut down in addition to its output buffer being placed in Tri-State. This family is housed in a 9×14 mm SMT package and operates with a +3.3V power supply.

See alsoCrystek’s 3500MHz VCO

See alsoCrystek launches 2.5GHz phase locked clock source

david manners

Source: Electronics Weekly

Posted on

Windows 10 build 10532 is here, with revamped menus and a few big bugs

Microsoft continues to revamp Windows 10, even as more and more users shift over to the operating system in its official form. The latest build 10532, released Thursday to Insiders, makes one visual change and widens the potential audience for new suggestions.

Oh, and it also breaks the 64-bit version of Chrome, as well as Windows Hello.

As updates go, build 10532 is relatively minor. The most significant revision is “improved context menus” that aim for consistency within the light and dark themes of Windows 10. Users will also be invited to try out new features using the Insider Hub.

Under the hood, though, Microsoft has made its Windows Feedback more pervasive. Before, any suggestions were made and communicated directly to Microsoft, with the ability for other users to see and to vote on them. Now, with the new Feedback app, you can also share your suggestion to any app that supports sharing: Twitter, Facebook, et cetera. Upcoming mobile builds will also have the same capability, Microsoft said.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: PC Weekly

Posted on

Murata power supply provides 12Vdc output at 1,200W

Murata has announced DC-input front end power supply modules with a 1,000VRMS isolated power supply providing a 12Vdc output at 1,200W with a standby voltage at up to 20W.

Murata's DC-input front end power supply

Murata’s DC-input front end power supply

With a power density of 28W per cubic inch, 54.5mm (2.15-inch) width and 1U height, it is suitable for 1U and 2U applications in servers, storage equipment, data centers, and telecommunications network equipment, says the company.

D1U54-D-1200 series DC-input models accommodate an operating input voltage range of -40Vdc to -72Vdc. This product series complements the AC-input D1U54P-W-1200 models and allows plug-and-play compatibility between products.

The hot-swap-enabled D1U54-D-1200 series has integral mosfet ORing in conjunction with active current sharing of the main output. These features allow up to eight units to operate in parallel, providing the capability to drive larger loads or to build in N+N redundancy of supplies.

With a PMBus compliant digital interface, the supply can be monitored, managed and controlled using industry standard PMBus protocol commands. Safety features of the new series include over-voltage, over-current and over-temperature protection.

Model selection includes choice of 3.3Vdc or 5.0Vdc standby outputs as well as forward or reverse airflow.

david manners

Source: Electronics Weekly

Posted on

Super intelligent machines spawned by AI? Execs aren't worried

It’s the premise of many science fiction novels and movies: Super-intelligent robot machines that can outsmart humans, if not terminate them entirely. But the prospect doesn’t exactly frighten some of today’s experts in the field.

“It’s a distraction,” said Nigel Duffy, chief technology officer at AI software maker Sentient Technologies.

More pressing issues, he said, revolve around the role algorithms play online in determining whether people are allowed to get a mortgage, or establish a line of credit.

His remarks were echoed by others in the industry, during a panel discussion on Wednesday at an event in Silicon Valley focused on artificial intelligence.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: PC Weekly

Posted on

Facebook's M blends AI assists with human help

When it comes to questions asked online, which ones are best handled by a machine, and which ones require human intervention? Facebook thinks it can perform the triage with M, its new personal digital assistant.

M is unique in the hotly competitive field of AI. It’s meant to provide information, like the best nearby hiking spots, or the best burger joint. But it’s also designed to complete tasks, like help someone order flowers for a parent’s birthday, recommend which baby shoes to buy, or book travel arrangements.

“It’s powered by artificial intelligence that’s trained and supervised by people,” said David Marcus, heading of messaging at Facebook, in announcing the initial test launch of the service on Wednesday.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: PC Weekly

Posted on

Position sensing is all about seeing black

Light-based proximity sensors for use in robots and 3D printers must not be fooled by transparent or black surfaces, says Gabriele Fulco

Figure 1: Reflective microsensor

Figure 1: Reflective microsensor

A surprising number of systems depend on the ability to accurately locate and identify physical objects. Robots need not only to detect obstacles, but also to identify the type of floor they are on, and to be aware of steps before they fall off them.

3D printers and IP cameras each present a whole new set of challenges. Vending machines need to handle a growing number of different types of packaging, including transparent glass and plastics.

The role of sensors

Light-based proximity sensors, alternatively known as photo‑microsensors (Figure 1), slotted switches, opto-switches or optical switches and photo interrupters, are generally used to detect the presence or absence of objects, to measure the speed and direction of rotating objects and in other applications.

Infra-red and visible LEDs have rated lifespans of over 100,000 hours, giving opto-switches an effectively infinite operational life. They can switch in four microseconds and operate at high frequency of up to 3,000 counts per second.

These characteristics make transmissive and reflective photo microsensors deservedly popular in office equipment, industrial automation systems, vending machines and home and building automation.

Figure 2: Transmissive slotted photo-interrupter

Figure 2: Transmissive slotted photo-interrupter

Of the newer applications, 3D printers require detection of the position of the print head, and confirmation of correct feeding and movement of the filament; IP cameras need to detect the angle and position of the camera body; and there are countless requirements to detect position in fitness and massaging machines.

Established styles don’t necessarily fully address these new applications. Although they detect most surface textures and colours, they don’t easily detect transparent objects and can be fooled by black items too.

Many have a ‘slotted’ style where the size of the object detected is limited by the width of the slot (Figure 2). They do have a long sensing distance, which can be good, but can also be a drawback as spurious detections can result from objects moving into the background.

New approaches

New technologies are emerging which not only benefit the newer designs, but have advantages for developers of the more established applications too.

Figure 3: Light convergent reflective sensor

Figure 3: Light convergent reflective sensor

Light convergent reflective sensors (Figure 3) detect only objects that are a specific distance from the sensor. They can eliminate background and can detect both specular and diffuse reflecting objects reliably, regardless of their colour or material. They were originally developed for robot cleaning units, which needed to detect and reliably clean floors made of all kinds of materials in any colour.

Particular challenges for traditional optical sensors were detecting floors with glass or black areas. Traditional sensors also struggled to identify downward steps.

Using the new light convergent technology, robot cleaners can be reliably programmed to turn away from ‘cliffs’ and can accurately identify all kinds of floor coverings, implementing the most appropriate cleaning approach for each one.

The same technology is now also being widely applied in printers, allowing them to detect a much wider range of materials including black paper and clear film. Similarly, vending machines can now detect transparent cups, eliminating the need to fit a label to clear glass or plastic items to ensure that they are detected.

Checking the distance

Also new is the introduction of micro displacement sensors. These calculate the distance of the detected object, producing an output voltage proportional to the distance.

Typical devices can detect displacements with a resolution of 10 microns at a distance range of 6.5mm ±1.0mm. They are accurate enough, for example, to detect a double feed in a copier, count the notes in a cash dispenser and detect the amount of paper remaining on a till roll in a mini printer or point-of-sale system.

The first proximity switches were introduced in 1960, and LED type photo electric sensors in the early 1970s.

Although the core principle of pairing an LED light source with a detector remains the same, switches have increased considerably in sophistication and accuracy since then. Light-based proximity sensors continue to develop and it is inevitable that robotics and 3D visualisation will drive further improvements in this technology.

Gabriele Fulco is European product marketing manager for sensors at Omron Electronic Components

Richard Wilson

Source: Electronics Weekly

Posted on

Test Post Location GEO Tags